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The ins and outs of pool design

Design: Phase Two

Phase two involved taking the project’s essential element (i.e. pool) along with its supporting features (i.e. grotto with waterfalls, slide, firepit, etc.) and finessing them into a more deliberate plan. During this phase of a project, concentration is placed on the details and appearance of the various buildings and features that are to be included.

C:UsersrobertDocumentsA-HDD-2011135-10 Hampton MoniqueMoni
To provide the client with a better idea of how the completed project would look, elevation shots of the large garage, pool, pool house and several other key features were produced.
C:UsersrobertDocumentsA-HDD-201158-11 MoniqueMonique Final
Construction/material breakouts were added to the plan to give the client a better idea of how the project would look when completed.

The Monique project initially had an Okanagan look and feel; however, upon introducing a few Mexican Rivera elements to the design, including large-stone carvings and thatched roofs, the clients liked the idea, but a recent trip to Bali morphed the Rivera into a tropical Indonesian beach getaway. This was great for the project as it helped in designing and shaping the look and feel of the outdoor space.

To provide the client with a better idea of how the completed project would look, elevation shots of the large garage, pool, pool house and several other key features were produced. From the elevation shots construction/material breakouts were added to the plan to get a better idea of how it would look when completed.

With the Bali theme in place, we contacted Sun Country, a local supplier dealing with products from Indonesia and the surrounding area was contacted and they provided direct contact with suppliers in Bali who could help produce some of the elements being sought. From simple stone carvings to full wooden cabanas and marble tiles, we were able to source a fair bit of product. This allowed the design to truly evolve into a Bali oasis.

Changes and alterations

Phase two took approximately four weeks and involved additional changes and alterations to the plan, with the major issues being height restrictions and privacy. For instance, in looking at the varying view angles to the lake from the pool, it was determined that raising the pool would be necessary to ensure a clear, infinity-edge reveal to all areas of the upper deck. In doing so, however, there was a need to keep the building’s rooflines to a minimum in order to stay below the height restriction.

At this point, it was decided to remove some overhead wires, which ran along the side and front of the property. This was easier said than done, as it took a few iterations to come up with a plan that not only created a private experience for the client complete with a spectacular view from inside and outside the pool, but also one that conformed to the property’s requirements.

A grotto experience

Hampton Living model r6
To create the grotto experience the client was looking for, the project went from initial design to clay models to full-engineered drawings.

During this phase of the design, various options were also explored for creating the grotto experience the client was looking for. Due to the location’s extreme weather variables—cold winters and extremely hot summers—it was important the grotto could handle the area’s freeze-thaw cycle. With this in mind, it was decided to use a faux-rock material that could be custom manufactured to the project’s specifications.

This element became a sub-design process on its own. Working with a third party to design and build the rock grotto, slide, waterfalls, firepit, tunnel and pool surround was a three-week program. It went from initial design to clay models to full-engineered drawings with several changes along the way. As it would turnout, this feature became the main focus of the pool and a key focal point to the outdoor design space.

Incorporating the cabana

The last elements of phase two were incorporating the Bali-style features and making the cabana a unique feature all on its own. To do this, the client was presented with a twist with respect to a ‘floating-effect’ design.

Typically, this involves building the cabana inside the pool; however, the property for the Monique project did not provide sufficient space to do this. Instead, a unique water spillway system was designed to create the illusion the entire cabana was floating on water. The design also incorporated a weeping-wall element, which would operate off of the main pool pumps to create the appearance of an elevated, floating cabana.

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